Updating EXIF metadata in JavaScript (and WebAssembly)

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One question that’s been raised about the camera/save button in zoomable images is whether or not the new image contains, or preserves, existing EXIF metadata information stored in the original file. The answer yesterday was: No. The answer today is: Not yet, but only because we haven’t enabled it and we will do that soon.

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on April 14, 2021 and tagged golang, exif, javascript, wasm and zoomable.

Reverse-Geocoding in Time at SFO Museum

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Have you ever wanted to be able to reverse-geocode a point not just in space but also in time? Have you ever wanted to do that date-filtering with fuzzy or imprecise dates, encoded using the Extended DateTime Format (EDTF) ? Have you ever wanted to do both of these things with an arbitrary subset of location records? Have you ever wanted to be able expose these things as a web application and an API that doesn’t need to talk to a remote database? Have you ever wanted to be able to deploy those applications both locally and as serverless applications running on a cloud-provider’s infrastructure? Now you can.

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on March 26, 2021 and tagged golang, tools, edtf and spatial.

Tools for Complex and Ambiguous Dates at SFO Museum

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The EDTF specification does all the work of defining the rules and semantics for encoding complex and ambiguous dates in to well-defined and structured strings and the go-edtf packages do the work of decomposing those strings in to values and flags that can be manipulated by computers.

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on January 14, 2021 and tagged golang, tools and edtf.

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