Blog posts tagged geotagging

Geotagging at SFO Museum: Client-side EXIF, Web Components, Tilepacks, AppRunner and Live Demos

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While this particular instantiation of the geotagging application is scoped to the physical boundaries of SFO the code itself is not specific to SFO Museum. It can be used, in combination with custom databases of map tiles and geographic data, with any image on your computer. This code will continue to be the common infrastructure that we build a SFO Museum application, specific to our needs, on top of.

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on June 16, 2021 and tagged golang, geotagging, aws, reverse-geocoding, tilezen, maps and aws.

Geotagging at SFO Museum: Protomaps, search and reverse-geocoding

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The bad news is that, when you look closely, there really are that many moving pieces when it comes to something like geotagging photos. The good news is that nearly all of those moving pieces, from the underlying data to the tools to operate on those data, are within the reach of cultural heritage as low-cost and open-source alternatives to the commercial offerings. We may still need to stitch those pieces together to meet the needs of a specific institution but at least they are within reach now.

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on May 03, 2021 and tagged golang, geotagging, whosonfirst, geocoding, reverse-geocoding, placeholder and maps.

Geotagging at SFO Museum, part 10 – Native Applications

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In the same way that we can wrap a traditional web application in a Go program, can we wrap that Go program in a native macOS application? Each platform has its own unique affordances and tolerances. A larger goal for the museum is recognizing the possibilities that each platform affords so that we might be able to treat them as a kind of “kit of parts” to be reconfigured as needed for future projects.

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on May 18, 2020 and tagged sfo, collection, geotagging, oauth2, golang, javascript and macos.

Geotagging at SFO Museum, part 9 – Publishing Data

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This post is about the go-www-geotag-sfomuseum application. It adds support for authenticating users and publishing data to any service that supports the OAuth2 standard. For the purposes of this post we’re using GitHub to demonstrate our work because we already publish all our open data on GitHub so it is useful for our geotagging application to be able to write directory to their API. In the future we might update our geotagging application to talk to SFO Museum’s own OAuth2 and API endpoints.

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on May 07, 2020 and tagged sfo, collection, geotagging, oauth2 and golang.

Geotagging at SFO Museum, Part 8 – Old maps

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What’s become clear as we work through geotagging photos in the SFO Museum collection is that it’s very useful to be able to geotag things using a map from, or near to, the same year that a photo was taken. The facts on the ground change often and fast enough at SFO that it can be hard to make sense of an old photo using a contemporary map.

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on May 04, 2020 and tagged sfo, collection, history, geotagging and maps.

Geotagging at SFO Museum, Part 7 – Custom Writers

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In order to support SFO Museum’s use case we would need to bundle all of the code required to implement the steps described above with the go-www-geotag application. That’s a lot of functionality that which not germane to another user of the application. It’s also, potentially, a lot of code that SFO Museum may not want or be able to share publicly. It’s a scenario that would have to be repeated for every custom writer adding unnecessary complexity and size to the final geotagging application.

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on May 01, 2020 and tagged sfo, collection, geotagging, whosonfirst and golang.

Geotagging at SFO Museum, Part 6 – Writers

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So far, we’ve got a map and a camera, a global search endpoint, a simple way to query for and display images and enough information to display already geotagged images correctly. Importantly none of these things are specific to our museum or any other institution. In fact there’s nothing about go-www-geotag that is specific to the cultural heritage sector at all. You could use this tool to geotag any set of images. But what about saving the geotagging information that the Leaflet.GeotagPhoto extension produces?

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on April 30, 2020 and tagged sfo, collection, geotagging and golang.

Geotagging at SFO Museum, Part 5 – Images

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If the go-www-geotag application is designed to be agnotic to the details of any one user’s data sources how does it know where to find and load the images it’s meant to geotag? Isn’t this exactly the problem I described in the first post in this series, a scenario where the go-www-geotag application is required to know about an infinite number of image sources? Rather than trying to support a potentially infinite list of image sources we’ve decided to require the use of the oEmbed standard as the means by which images are identified and loaded in to the application.

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on April 29, 2020 and tagged sfo, collection, geotagging, oembed and iiif.

Geotagging at SFO Museum, Part 4 – Search

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But what if you want to center the map on a different place and don’t already know its latitude and longitude coordinates? What if you need to jump around to a bunch of different places all over the world?

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on April 28, 2020 and tagged sfo, collection, geotagging, placeholder and search.

Geotagging at SFO Museum, Part 3 – What Is the Simplest Thing?

Title image for Geotagging at SFO Museum, Part 3 – What Is the Simplest Thing?

I call this the “building with two-by-fours” stage of development to highlight the importance of not just building things quickly but equally being able to disassemble and rearrange them just as easily. Sometimes this happens at the expense of elegance and finish but that doesn’t diminish their importance or a commitment to address those things.

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on April 27, 2020 and tagged sfo, collection, geotagging and golang.

Geotagging at SFO Museum, part 2 – First Steps

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In the end we may deploy this application for staff as a hosted website on the internet but we would like to have the ability and the flexibility for staff to also run the application locally, from their desktop. The majority of museum staff are not developers and won’t know how or be able, or want, to install the external dependencies that might be necessary for an application written in another programming language to run.

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on April 24, 2020 and tagged geotagging, sfo, collection, golang and maps.

Geotagging Photos at SFO Museum, Part 1 – Setting the Stage

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This is the first of multi-part blog post (11 in all!) about geotagging photos in the SFO Museum collection. It’s also a blog post about how we’re doing that work and why we’re taking a longer road than we might otherwise to get there. Over the course of the next couple weeks we’ll post one short blog post a day focused on a specific step, or area of concern, in that process. This first blog post will set the stage and outline some of our motivations for seeing geotagging photos in our collection as a chance to address larger issues in the cultural heritage sector.

This is a blog post by aaron cope. It was published on April 23, 2020 and tagged sfo, collection, geotagging and nypl.