Remembering the He’e Nalu : Wave Riding exhibition at SFO Museum

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As legend has it according to O’Neill’s own account, his eureka moment shortly following the vest’s creation took place at San Francisco International Airport. After boarding a DC-3 for Los Angeles he looked down at the floor noticing a thin padding of black rubber sticking out from under the edge of the carpet. The material, a synthetic rubber invented by DuPont and named neoprene, helped insulate the heated passenger cabin from the frigid spaces below deck. It was smooth sealed, closed cell, flexible, quite strong, and proved fairly impervious to saltwater. Soon the era of the wetsuit was fueling the allure of surfing for the masses.

This is a blog post by john.hill. It was published on March 09, 2019.

The @SFOMuseum Twitter Archive

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It is important to recognize that Belinda’s work is not simply “non-institutional contextualization of digitized collection objects” but an important contribution, one that is central to the museum’s mission. Darren’s comments, though, served to highlight the fact that we haven’t done a great job of “capturing” or “archiving” any of it. Until now!

This is a blog post by aaron.cope. It was published on March 06, 2019.

Headers, menus and feeds - A quick update

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As you may have noticed from our last blog post “People Looking at Art at SFO (1982 - 2019)” we are in the thick of processing the back catalog of installation photos for all the exhibitions SFO Museum has done since 1980. I am already thinking about a second “People Taking Pictures of Art at SFO” blog post but in the meantime we’ve made a couple additions and few changes, improvements hopefully, to the Mills Field website itself.

This is a blog post by aaron.cope. It was published on March 01, 2019.

People Looking at Art at SFO (1982 - 2019)

Title image for People Looking at Art at SFO (1982 - 2019)

A selection of photos of people looking at the many exhibitions put on by SFO Museum, since 1982, throughout the terminals and the airport’s always-changing architecture. There is a lot more to say on the subject but this time we’ll let the pictures do the talking.

This is a blog post by aaron.cope. It was published on February 26, 2019.

Using IIIF (with AWS) at SFO Museum

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At the end of that first blog post about go-iiif we wrote “An ideal scenario is one where a museum could upload a set of full-sized images to a AWS S3 bucket, wait for Amazon’s computers to process each image … and then find a new set of images to download (along with a reasonable bill for services rendered) in a different S3 bucket.” Today, that is possible.

This is a blog post by aaron.cope. It was published on February 12, 2019.

Capturing flight data at SFO and SFO Museum

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This is historical data compiled by harvesting flight data throughout the day, aggregating it overnight and finally publishing atomic records for every flight that graces our runways. That’s interesting enough on the face of it but what we think is even more exciting is that every record contains pointers back to things already in the SFO Museum collection. … With only a few exceptions all of the airlines and gates and airports that comprise any given flight, on any given day, all have a pre-existing relationship with the objects in our collection.

This is a blog post by aaron.cope. It was published on January 18, 2019.

Where is Gate A1?

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We’ve updated the location data for gates to make the primary location, for each gate, the doorway between the terminal and jetway (rather than the jetway and an airplane).

This is a blog post by aaron.cope. It was published on January 14, 2019.

Surface Areas – Photos and Depictions on the Mills Field Website

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Starting today there are pictures on the Mills Field website! Not all the images but approximately 1,500 photographs of exhibitions on display in the terminals and another 1,500 photos of airports and aircraft related to the SFO Museum collection, taken by Flickr users (and published under a Creative Commons license) … As I write this there are another 30 years worth of exhibition photos to process and another 100,000 Flickr photos to review so this is just the beginning but we’re excited to finally share the work we’ve already done so far.

This is a blog post by aaron.cope. It was published on January 02, 2019.

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